Lower Limb Muscle Mass & Visceral Fat Mass

Some interesting research with a helpful conclusion:

Research
Association of lower limb muscle mass and energy expenditure with visceral fat mass in healthy men
Shusuke Yagi1*†, Muneyuki Kadota1†, Ken-ichi Aihara2, Koji Nishikawa3, Tomoya Hara1, Takayuki Ise1, Yuka Ueda1, Takashi Iwase1, Masashi Akaike4, Michio Shimabukuro5, Shinsuke Katoh3 and Masataka Sata1

* Corresponding author: Shusuke Yagi syagi@tokushima-u.ac.jp

† Equal contributors
Author Affiliations

Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome 2014, 6:27 doi:10.1186/1758-5996-6-27

Published: 26 February 2014

fatbellyAbstract
Background
A high-calorie diet and physical inactivity, an imbalance between caloric intake and energy consumption, are major causes of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which manifests as accumulation of visceral fat and insulin resistance. However, the lifestyle-related factors associated with visceral fat mass in healthy men are not fully understood.

Methods
We evaluated visceral fat area (VFA), skeletal muscle mass, caloric intake, and energy expenditure in 67 healthy male participants (mean age, 36.9 ± 8.8 years; body mass index 23.4 ± 2.5 kg/m2).

Results
Multiple regression analysis showed that the total skeletal muscle mass (P <  0.001) were negatively and age (P < 0.001) were positively associated with VFA. Lower limb muscle mass (P < 0.001) was strongly associated with VFA. However, total caloric intake, total energy expenditure, and energy expenditure during exercise were not associated with VFA. Conclusions
Skeletal muscle mass especially lower limb muscle mass negatively contributes to visceral fat mass in healthy men. Therefore, maintaining lower limb muscular fitness through daily activity may be a useful strategy for controlling visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome.

From:http://www.dmsjournal.com/content/6/1/27/abstract

Let’s keep on squatting!

See Ya at the gym.


Print pagePDF pageEmail page
 

About Vic

As a retired Commercial/Missionary pilot and administrator, I started taking SilverSneakers® classes in 2007. Although I had kept up minimal jogging and biking, I had little lean body mass and extra fat, so I started lifting weights and joined a Group Power barbell class. Later I was challenged to use free weights for heavier lifting and body weight exercises for flexibility and functional fitness. The SilverSneakers® Coordinator asked if I would train to teach the class. Little did I realize that it would take almost a year, four classes, a practical evaluation, plus an on-line 100 question test, to complete the certification. I am still impressed with the research and years of practical experience that has gone into the SilverSneakers® model.
This entry was posted in Fitness, Health and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply